Symbol Poster: Robot


Sean Batac, 2008


digital print


24" x 36"


Students chose an object and were guided through an image making methodology where they explored how form, content and context work together to create a meaningful symbol. They then chose a business or cultural institution for which to design a poster using the symbol they developed.

> first semester sophomore <

symbol poster: Bat


Kendra Hoskin, 2009


digital print


24" x 36"


> first semester sophomore <

symbol poster: Button


Jane Byrom, 2010


digital print


24" x 36"


> first semester sophomore <

Symbol Poster: Dragon


Carole Anne Pecchia, 2010


digital print


24" x 36"


> first semester sophomore <

Symbol Poster final exhibition, 2010


Each semester we asked the students to curate, organize and install a day-long exhibition of their final posters.

Symbol Poster final exhibition, 2010


Symbol Poster final exhibition, 2010


In addition the students developed criteria for several awards, managed the voting and held a ceremony recognizing the most successful work.

Visual Literacy Zine: Japanese Tokugawa (Cover)


Julie (Blue) Broxton, 2009


multi-media collage


7" x 8.5"


Students research an art historical movement and use the tenets and visual themes of that movement as content for form-making exercises. Students assemble a 'zine of their results.

> first semester sophomore <

Visual Literacy Zine: Japanese Tokugawa (spreads)


Julie (Blue) Broxton, 2009


Visual Literacy Zine: Japanese Tokugawa (spread)


Julie (Blue) Broxton, 2009


Zine Show 2009


Students invited the school to an pop-up exhibition of their final 'zines. To offer context for visitors, students assembled a library of references for each historical movement their work addressed.

Zine Show 2009


Students displayed their final 'zines on butcher paper-covered tables so they could leave each other comments on the work.

alter ego mask, 2009


This one-day, interstitial event asked students to use the materials they found on campus to construct a mask for their "alter ego" that communicated a side of them their classmates may not know about. When they were finished, we asked them to form groups based on affinities they saw in the subject, material or sentiment of their masks.